Forest Hill Cemetery - A Walking Tour - Madison WI



Catlin Chapel
Catlin Chapel
The celebration of death, in all of its sacredness; with loving sentiments of hope and resilience, and symbols of the values to which lives were dedicated; marks a serene landscape on Madison's near West side. The walking tour of Madison's Forest Hill Cemetery is not a spooky or morbidly curious attraction. It is, however, one of the finest ways to learn about the history of Wisconsin's State Capital. The tour is a biographical journey exploring the founding of a city, a state, and a nation. Along the way you will learn about the construction of the capitol dome, discoveries of bacterium, famous battles for freedom in the Civil War, the establishment of a parks system, the honoring of spirit animals, and much more.

The walking tour of the cemetery was established by the Madison Parks Commission. You can print off their PDF map and brochure. My blog post here will go into further biographical detail, support the tour with photography, and will provide you the tools to read the secret language of the graveyard - cemetery iconography. From broken columns to resting lambs - each image has a meaning and peculiar purpose.




Best Deaths


It is recorded that the happiest
death in history may belong to Chilon
of Sparta, one of the seven sages,
councilor to the king who enjoyed
walking quietly in the bright sun

of the Peloponnese among the olive
trees. It is possible, even likely, that he stopped
to drag his hand over their leaves.
He was famous for bringing into style the laconic
form of speech, short in utterance

and heavy in meaning like the very same
trees in fruit. Old and gnarled, it is said
that he actually died of pride
in the arms of his son who had just won
an Olympic event. Then he stepped through a door

that got smaller and smaller as he
entered until he was quiet and edgeless
as space. And perhaps he would have kept
the distinction of “best death” except
for Don Doane from Ravenna, Michigan,

who was far from sage, who never predicted
an eclipse that stopped a war, who
was just some guy who bowled
a perfect game for the first time in his life
then promptly died. Don Doane, who

snuffed out his cigarettes on the thin
gold ashtrays, who wasn’t the first
to advise “everything in moderation”
nor did he visit the oracle at Delphi
and read the words “Know thyself”

and most likely (like you or me) he didn’t
know himself very well. At most, maybe,
he wondered in odd moments in the bowling
alley bar when all the pins fell silent
how he even became himself.
The little plastic sword in his
cocktail pierced the heart of the cherry,
and he pulled on his thick gloves
in the silent winter
parking lot to scrape the frost

from his windshield only enough to reach
the light kept on at home. Don Doane,
who knew the universe was a cold place
in which there is little kindness
and fewer gods to bring it,

given only a single mercy—
his friends’ images in the buffed floor,
arms raised when the final pins fell.


Frank Montesonti.
Author of:
Blight, Blight, Blight, Ray of Hope  www.barrowstreet.org


FOLLOW ALONG ON THE PDF WALKING TOUR MAP
Download the Forest Hill Cemetery Walking Tour Map Here

1. Catlin Chapel

Catlin Chapel
Catlin Chapel
The Catlin Chapel was used by visitors to the cemetery for prayer, reflection, and shelter. In its early years, Forest Hill was a three mile walk from Madison; the chapel was used for rest by visitors who made the long walk. 

The chapel is named for John Catlin, Clerk of the Territorial Supreme Court at the first session in Belmont WI (The First State Capitol). Mr. Catlin platted Madison in 1837 ans was the first City Postmaster, first lawyer, first District Attorney, and Dane County's first judge. He also served as secretary of the Wisconsin Territory between 1846 and 1848. Wisconsin became a state in 1848. Catlin is not buried in Wisconsin.



2. Receiving Vault

Receiving Vault
Receiving Vault
A bit of macabre practicality, the receiving vault was used to store those who had the misfortune of passing away in the cold winter months. Burials were delayed until the ground thawed in March and April.

3. Daniel K Tenney (1834-1915)

Daniel K Tenney
Daniel K Tenney
Tenney Park on Madison's Near East Side is famous for it's picturesque skating pond. It is one of Madison's first pleasure grounds (what we call a public park today). And, it is aptly named. Daniel Tenney donated the land - but on the condition that it be a park and forever held in the public trust.

Tenney was one of the first University of Wisconsin students, became a lawyer, and began a successful practice in Chicago where he amassed his wealth representing victims of the Chicago Fire. He was also the youngest elected Madison Common Councilmen in 1860.

As many UW students are prone to be rebellious, so was young Tenney:

At Harrisburgh D. K. Tenney of Madison who accompanied the regiment as state agent, received a pretty severe handling at the hands of some of the officers and men of the regiment. He insulted two of our field officers outrageously and was immediately pitched into indiscriminately by some company officers and men and had it not been for the interference of the very field officers he had so grossly libelled he would have been killed, as it is he is in Harrisburgh seriously hurt. I learn that he has been removed from his post as state agent on account of his conduct. - B. N. M.—Benjamin N. Meeds of Company B, 6th Wisconsin Infantry, the Prescott Guards.
  http://www.pinterest.com/larrytenney/tenney-the-story-of-us/

4. Steven Vaughn Shipman (1825-1905)

Steven V. Shipman
Steven V. Shipman
Born in Pennsylvania, Shippman learned the craft of building and architecture from his father. In 1855 he designed the dome and rotunda of the Third Wisconsin State Capitol - which burned in 1904 five weeks after the fiscally conservative legislature voted to cancel the capitol's fire insurance policy.



Ebenezer Bringham
Ebenezer Bringham
5. Ebenezer Brigham (1789-1861) Section 27

Mr. Bringham was the first permanent white settler in Dane County, a member of the Territorial Legislature, and one of three commissioners to erect the first Capitol in Madison (The Second State Capitol)

"He was a pure type of western pioneer manhood, modest, quiet, unassuming, and never given to boasting." Leaving Illinois, which he considered unhealthy, he was already in middle age when he traveled north from St. Louis prospecting for "Mineral" as it was known. He came to what is now Blue Mounds, Wisconsin, and there discovered a lead lode of some significance which became known as "the Brigham lead." -John C. Ward
Ebenezer Bringham
Ebenezer Bringham
When men were men - Ebenezer Brigham traveled by canoe along the Allegheny then flatboat down the Ohio, and finally walked the rest of the way to St. Louis. He founded Galena Illinois with miner James Johnson. He also built the first structure in Dane County - his cabin near Blue Mounds. In case this was not enough to impress his descendants, he also served as magistrate, justice-of-the-peace, postmaster of Moundville, state assemblyman, and as a Colonel in the Black Hawk War.

Surprisingly, Mr. Brigham himself was not made of iron nor lead, and was discovered to be mortal. He died at the home of his niece - Mrs H G Bliss in Madison on September 14, 1861 at the young age of 73.



ICONOGRAPHY: BORROMEAN RINGS 

Borromean Rings
Borromean Rings

Borromean Rings often symbolize the holy trinity in Christianity. However, their use is much older. They are named for the Italian family Borromeo who use the rings as their crest. Across cultures they represent the real, the imaginary, and the symbolic. They were the inspiration for Freud's Id, ego, and superego. They also represent the past, present, and future as existing concurrently. Examples of this symbol have been found in every civilization - ancient and modern - spanning the full length of human history in all corners of the world. Three rings encircled displays the most stable proportion in construction ... 3/4. In the symbol pictured above there is one set of three circles and a total of 4 circles. In this case the symbol signifies stability and structure more so than it does the holy trinity. Perhaps the grave an architect.


Govenor Louis Harvey
Govenor Louis Harvey
 6. Louis Harvey Family - Louis (1820-1862) Section 2

Governor Louis Harvey was a member of the state Constitutional Convention in 1847, state senator from 1854-1858, secretary of state from 1860-1862, and governor from January to April of 1862. He drowned in the Tennessee River while stepping from a tethered boat to a moving steamboat on a quest to aid Wisconsin troops after the battle of Shiloh. His wife, Colonel Cordelia Harvey (1824-1895) ministered to Union soldiers and founded the first soldier's hospital in the North - The Harvey Hospital.

"As the bow of the Minnehaha rounded close to the party on the Dunleith, the Governor stepped back on one side, either for convenience or to get beyond harm, and the night being dark and rainy, and the timber of the boat slippery, by some mis-step he fell between the two steamers. Dr. Wilson, of Sharon, being near, immediately reached down his cane, which the Governor grasped with so much force as to pull it from his hands. Dr. Clark, of Racine, jumped into the water, made himself fast to the Minnehaha and thrust his body in the direction of the Governor, who, he thinks, once almost reached him, but the current was too strong, the drowning man, it is supposed, was drawn under a flatboat just below, and when his life was despaired of, Dr. Wolcott and General Brodhead Milwaukee, and others of the party, made diligent and long search to recover the body of the lost one, but in vain, some children found it sixty-five miles below" -Military History of Wisconsin, Quiner1866
Govenor Louis Harvey
Govenor Louis Harvey



7. William Freeman Vilas (1840-1908)

William F. Vilas
William F. Vilas
A United States Senator, a captain in the 23rd Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment during the Civil War, Secretary of the Interior under Grover Cleveland, and U.S. Postmaster General, William Vilas made his mark. Vilas County is named in his honor. Henry Vilas Zoo and Park were named in the memory of his son who died at  a young age of diabetes.

As Secretary of Interior, William Vilas had the misfortune of having to implement the destructive Dawes Act - which is otherwise known as "assimilation", an act he fully supported and wished to be more severe. Assimilation was a death blow to American Indian culture and one of the darkest hours of the United States' treatment of human beings next to slavery. Under its provisions, American Indians were forced to break up their reservations into individual allotments, send their children to schools where native languages were banned, cut their long hair, and otherwise make every effort to 'become white'. As a result of the Dawes Act, most native languages were entirely wiped out, just as most American Indian lands were reallocated to white settlers.

William F. Vilas
William F. Vilas
To his credit, William Vilas intended for the first time to not mislead the tribal nations into signing a treaty. The provisions were to be fully, fairly, and plainly explained to tribal representatives - an order which Vilas made explicit.

Chief Sitting Bull of the Hunkpapa Council of the Lakota speaking nation met with Vilas in Washington D.C. - Vilas supported a clause in the Dawes Bill which would pay Indians only fifty cents per acre for land which was valued at more than $1. Sitting Bull insisted on $1.25.

In 1888 William Vilas split the Great Sioux Reservation into five smaller reservations. This resulted in acceleration of the Ghost Dance Movement. By late 1890, after Vilas's term had ended, the tensions between the Federal Government and Sitting Bulls' Sioux councils, largely created by Vilas and Sitting Bulls' mutual animosity, reached its climax at the Battle of Wounded Knee in which the US Army opened fire on a village of Sioux following the refusal of a deaf hunter to relinquish his rifle. 153 Sioux were killed - mostly Women and Children.

In his own words:

"This and other enactments which can afford a remedy for the evils of tribal and reservation life, and which tend to individualize and Americanize the Indian, will solve one of the most difficult questions involved in Indian civilization. Any policy which brings him into the honest activity of civilization, and especially into the atmosphere of our agricultural, commercial, industrial examples, assures to him mutual, moral, and physical development into independent manhood. Any policy which prolongs the massing, inactive, herding systems continues to lead to destruction and death. It is folly to hope for substantial cure except there be radical change in treatment." Respectfully submitted - Hon. Wm F. Vilas - 1888 Dept. of Interior Annual Report. 


8. Napoleon Bonaparte Van Slyke (1822 - 1909)

Napoleon Bonaparte Van Slyke
Napoleon Bonaparte Van Slyke
Napoleo B Van Slyke, a member of Madison's first common council, designated Forest Hill as a cemetery to replace the UW  chemistry building grounds on University avenue. The fact that Forest Hill was three miles from the city center did not discourage Mr. Van Slyke who evidently realized that Madison was determined to grow into a larger city than it was in the 1850's. Mr. Van Slyke died of pneumonia.

9. Breese J. Stevens

Breese J. Stevens
Breese J. Stevens
Mr. Stevens served as an early mayor of Madison. He was fond of good poetry and literature, especially the love poems of Robert Burns which he often recited to the delight of his listeners.

Robert Burns published a fiction novel entitled "Until the Day Break" in 1990. The sentiment engraved on the Breese Stevens grave marker reads: Vntill The Day Breaks.

Breese J. Stevens
Breese J. Stevens



ICONOGRAPHY: LAMBS

Iconography: Lambs
Iconography: Lambs
As you look about, you will find many lambs resting on headstones. These are the markers of those who died as children.


10. Fairchild Family

Jarius Fairchild
Jarius Fairchild
Jairus Fairchild was the first state Treasurer of the State of Wisconsin and Mayor of the City of Madison. His son Cassius served in the Wisconsin State Assembly and General Lucius Fairchild served as Wisconsin's Governor from 1866 to 1872.

General Fairchild saw action in the second Battle of Bull Run, Antietam, Stone Mountain, Fredericksburg, and Gettysburg where he lost is left arm. He was remembered as Wisconsin's Thrice Elected One Armed
Governor.

Jarius Fairchild
Jarius Fairchild


11. Harlow S. Orton

Harlow S. Orton
Harlow S. Orton
Chief Justice Orton served as a Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice and as Chief Justice. He is responsible for authoring the "eggshell skull rule".

In the case of Vosburg v. Putney - Orton wrote that a tortfeasor must take his victim as he finds him. This means that while a small offense which would normally not result in damage may result in damage if the victim has a fragile eggshell skull.

The case pitted two Waukesha school boys against each other. One kicked the other boy in the shin lightly. But, it turns out that the kicked boy happened to have had a sledding accident the week before and he had been kicked in exactly the same place of the injury so that the small kick resulted in the boy permanently loosing the leg. Certainly the kicking boy never intended for his friend to loose his leg, nonetheless he was responsible for breaking the eggshell.

This case is often taught to first year law students.

Orton Park in Madison is named in honor of Chief Justice Harlow Orton.

Harlow S. Orton
Harlow S. Orton


12. Elisha W. Keyes

Elisha W. Keyes
Elisha W. Keyes
Mr. Keyes was the Republican Boss notorious for engineering massive gerrymandering schemes in Wisconsin. He served as Postmaster General of Madison, Mayor of Madison, and in the State Assembly.


13. Deming Fitch
Deming Fitch
Deming Fitch

Madison's first Cemetery Superintendent, Mr. Fitch had the duty of removing bodies from the Sandhill Cemetery, and then from there to the Forest Hill Cemetery. He had the privilege to lay away two governors, one chief justice, six supreme court justices, and 14k other Madisonians.

ICONOGRAPHY: Broken Columns 

Broken columns on a headstone indicate a life cut short. See Lathrop family plot. 

14. Darwin Clark

Darwin Clark
Darwin Clark
Darwin Clark was the first pioneer to arrive in Madison - arriving three hours before Simeon Mills. He worked as a carpenter on the second state capitol building and ran a furniture store out of his home which was built on the first plot of land to be purchased in Madison. It was located on Main Street.


15. Harry Steenbock

Harry Steenbock
Harry Steenbock
Harry Steenbock was a professor of biochemistry at UW. He is credited with discovering the vitamins D, A, and B. Steenbock Library is named in his honor.


ICONOGRAPHY: WEEPING WILLOW - The weeping willow is the symbol of mourning for a sibling.

Icon Weeping Willow
Icon Weeping Willow


16. Lyman Copeland Draper (1815-1891) Section 2

Lyman Copeland Draper
Lyman Copeland Draper
Mr. Draper made it his life's work to record the history of the heroes of the Revolution. As corresponding secretary of the Wisconsin State Historical Society, Draper amassed a huge collection of documents and first hand accounts. He planned to use these histories to publish a complete series of volumes on the settlement of the Trans-Allegheny West. The Draper Manuscripts are the most complete primary source documentation of American history covering the period from the French and Indian War and the War of 1812 and includes interview notations, correspondence, newspaper articles, muster rolls, official documents and sketches.

Lyman Copeland Draper
Lyman Copeland Draper



17.  Theodore Read

Theodore Read
Theodore Read
General Read led a Union force to cut off General Lee's retreat to Appomattox. His orders were to secure the railroad and wagon bridges over the Appomattox River at High Bridge. The Battle of High Bridge was a disaster for the Union forces who suffered 847 casualties compared to 100 confederate casualties. However, they were able to secure the South end of the bridges and force Lee to change course. This change in course resulted in depriving Lee's army of reaching rations at Farmville, adding pressure for Lee to surrender.

General Read was shot point blank in the chest by the mounted Confederate General James Dearing. Colonel Washburn immediately engaged Dearing in a saber dual. During the saber duel Dearing intercepted a stray bullet with his chest and was mortally wounded. The day after the battle, Colonel Washburn was found on the battlefield alive having been shot through the mouth and with a saber planted deep in his skull. He died later that day.

There are many conflicting accounts of this melee.

18. William M. Hough (1803-1858) Section 1

William M. Hough
William M. Hough
A city engineer and county surveyor, Wm Hough developed the plans for the 40 acre Forest Hill Cemetery - designed in the rural cemetery style to mimic the popular Forest Hills Cemetery of Boston.

“Before his labors upon this home of the dead were ended, he himself has been summoned to become one of its first inmates.”



19. Henry Harnden (1823-1900) Section 5

Henry Harnden
Henry Harnden
General Henry Harnden, Commander of the Wisconsin Department of the Grand Army of the Republic, A Wisconsin Assemblyman, U.S. Assessor, and  U.S. Collector of Internal Revenues had commanded the Wisconsin troops that with a Michigan company captured the confederate "president" Jefferson Davis. He was born in Massachusetts in 1823, went to sea early in life, spent many years in California, participated in the Mexican War, and was wounded several times in the Civil War. He died of pneumonia in his home.


20. Charles E. Brown (1871-1946) Section 1

Charles E. Brown
Charles E. Brown
Mr. Brown was an archaeologist and head of the State Historical Society Museum. He was an early defender and preservationist of effigy mounds. On his behalf the famous effigy mounds found at Forest Hill were preserved.


21. Simeon Mills (1810-1895) Section 5

Simeon Mills
Simeon Mills
Born in Connecticut, the pioneer Simeon Mills was the second to arrive in Madison, three hours after Mr. Darwin Clark. He built the first store in Madison, the only general store between Milwaukee and Dodgeville. As a State Senator he introduced the bill to create the University of Wisconsin.


22. James Morrison

James Morrison
James Morrison
Scottish immigrant James Morrison founded Morrisonville in 1843. In the 1860's the Milwaukee Railroad between Milwaukee and Portage established a train depot in Morrisonville. A store, post office, hotel, and brothel thrived at Morrisonville. The railroad is now part of the Soo Line and while there is no longer a stop and depot, a train still thunders through Morrisonville daily.


23. John H. Lathrop and Sons

John H. Lathrop and Sons
John H. Lathrop and Sons
In 1849 John Hiram Lathrop, professor of mathematics and philosophy, was selected as the first chancellor of the University of Wisconsin in Madison. He recommended the seal and motto: Numen Lumen - meaning God our Light.



24. John M. Olin

John M. Olin
John M. Olin
John Olin is known as the father of the Madison park system. His vision was to have interconnecting parks and pleasure drives so that every neighborhood would be woven into the fabric of the city by its parks.


25. Samuel Klauber

Samuel Klauber
Samuel Klauber
Madison's first Jewish residents were bohemian immigrants Samuel Klauber and his wife Caroline. They amassed a fortune building a business from the ground up in Lake Mills and later moved to Madison. At the start of the Civil War, Mayor Orton appointed Klauber to lead a committee to raise money for families who had sent their main breadwinner off to battle.


26. Manfred Swarsensky

Rabbi Swarensky worked for thirty six years as Rabbi of the Temple Beth El, a Reform synagogue in Madison.
Manfred Swarsensky
Manfred Swarsensky


27. Effigy Mounds

Effigy Mounds
Effigy Mounds
The crisp rows of headstones that adorn the graves of Spanish American War heroes outline in stunning contrast the shapes of two panther mounds and three linear mounds. The composition of uniform headstones and mounds create a rare ground level visualization of effigy mound shape.


28. Goose Mound

A rare example of a goose mound can be found near the rear of the soldier's lot. Why moundbuilders created effigies (likenesses of animals) remains a mystery. Moundbuilding stopped about 200 years before Europeans arrived in the United States. Why this tradition of many thousand years suddenly ceased is also a mystery. What may be most mysterious of all - is that moundbuilders were of an era which preceded human flight, aerial photography, and plan view constructions - so it is amazing that the builders were able to conceive of a form which can only be distinguished clearly from an impossibly high vantage point. In other words, the builders were never capable of seeing their creation, yet they succeeded in constructing proportionally correct images.


29. Michael Olbrich

Michael Olbrich
Michael Olbrich
After graduating from the University Law School in 1905, Olbrich began his own law practice in Madison. Professional success came quickly and Olbrich's active campaign on behalf of LaFollette soon made him an influential figure in state Republican Party circles as well.

Olbrich was also deeply influenced by the example of another Madison attorney, John M. Olin, the longtime president of the nationally known Madison Park and Pleasure Drive Association, a private organization that had created Madison's outstanding park system. In Olin, Olbrich found both inspiration and a perfect model for living a life that united a career in the law with a passion for social betterment and a love of the natural world. Olin was deeply committed to the belief that exposure to the beauty of the natural world was essential to general well -being and he believed that a constantly expanding system of public parks was the best way to bring this beauty into the life of the average city dweller.

Olbrich Park and Botanical Gardens are named in his honor.


30. Stephen M. Babcock

Stephen M. Babcock
Stephen M. Babcock
Babcock is best known for his test for butterfat in milk, introduced in 1890. By using sulfuric acid to release the fat from its normal suspension and centrifuging and diluting, it was possible to measure directly the percentage of fat by observing it in the neck of a specially designed test bottle. The simplicity of the test permitted its use by persons without scientific training. Its use altered the economics of dairying and stimulated growth of the dairy industry.

Stephen M. Babcock
Stephen M. Babcock
Babcock’s most important contribution arose from his skepticism regarding the biological equivalency of chemically similar feeds from different crops. In 1907 four of his younger associates—E.B. Hart, E.V. McCollum, H. Steenbock, and G. Humphrey began a cattle-feeding experiment using chemically equivalent rations, each derived from a different plant. The experiment not only confirmed Babcock’s skepticism but led to studies that helped develop the vitamin concept.

The insanely popular Babcock Dairy on campus is named in his honor. As is Babcock Hall.


31. Jackson Family

Jackson Family Plot
Jackson Family Plot

Michael Jackson was captain of the minuteman company at the Battles of Lexington and Concord. He was one of few soldiers to serve in the Continental Army for the entirety of its existence. His brothers and sons moved the Jackson family to Madison where they helped establish Methodist Hospital and the Jackson Clinic which is now Meriter Hospital. 


32. Lafollette Family

Bob Lafollette Gravesite
Bob Lafollette Gravesite
Fighting Bob La Follette was selected in 1957 by the U.S. Senate as one of the five greatest U.S. Senators of all time. He was a champion of workers rights and the formation of unions. As Governor of Wisconsin he established the Wisconsin Idea - making Wisconsin the nation's laboratory of democracy.


33. Confederate Rest

The Confederate Rest
The Confederate Rest
This is the Northernmost Confederate Civil War Cemetery. In 1862, rebel troops from the 1st Alabama Infantry Regiment were sent to Island 10 in the Mississippi River near Cairo, Ill. Their mission was to disrupt supplies headed to Union Troops in the south. After weeks of tenacious fighting, they were forced to surrender. About 1,200 confederate soldiers, many severely wounded, were sent to Camp Randall where they were held as prisoners of war. About 120 died. They were put in a plot called the Confederate Rest in Madison's Forest Hill Cemetery. A few hundred yards away is the Union burial grounds.


34. Mausoleum

The Mausoleum
The Mausoleum

The Mausoleum was built in 1916

35. Union Soldier's Lot

Union Soldiers Lot
Union Soldiers Lot
Following the Civil War a great effort was made on to recover Union dead and return them to be buried in the local cemeteries. This task has yet to be completed.


36. Edward A. Birge

Edward Birge
Edward Birge

E. Birge is one of the founders of the field of limnology, the study of inland lakes and rivers. Along with collaborator Chancey Juday, he founded UW’s School of Limnology on Lake Mendota. Birge retired in 1925 but continued his research into the 1940s. He died in 1950; upon his death, the University renamed the Botany Building in his honor.


37. Charles Van Hise

Charles Van Hise
Charles Van Hise
Van Hise was one of the first to use the petro-graphic microscope to expand petrology, the study of the origin, structure, chemical composition, and classification of rocks. His analysis of crystalline rocks helped provide a foundation for applying quantitative methods to geological studies. In 1883, he began working for the U.S. Geological Survey. From 1888 to 1890, he did studies of iron-bearing districts of the Lake Superior region that were helpful to the mining industry there. In 1900, he was appointed geologist in charge of the survey's division of Precambrian and Metamorphic Geology and served as consulting geologist from 1909 to 1918. During that time, he developed his theories of metamorphism, stating that rock characteristics change according to recognized physical and chemical laws.

Charles Van Hise

Charles Van Hise

38. Cemetery Office

Believe it or not, it once a thing to do to have a picnic at the cemetery. Madisonians hopped on the street car downtown and took it to the end of the line at Forest Hill Cemetery. The cemetery office served as the waiting room and station for the street car. The cemetery office was constructed in 1908.


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